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RESEARCH

Arts and humanities research represents a range of disciplines and distinctive modes of knowledge and methods that result in articles and books, ideas, exhibitions, performances, artifacts, and more. This deliberate and dedicated work generates deep insights into the multi-faceted people and cultures of the world past and present. 

Whether individual or collaborative, funded or unfunded, learn how our faculty are leading national networks and conferences, providing research frameworks, engaging students, traversing international archives and making significant contributions to UMD's research enterprise. Learn more about the college's research goals.        

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2017 (Spring) semester-long Research and Scholarship Award, the Graduate School, University of Maryland. 

2017 (Spring) semester-long Research and Scholarship Award, the Graduate School, University of Maryland. 

English

Lead: Ralph Robert Bauer
Dates:

2017 (Spring) semester-long Research and Scholarship Award, the Graduate School, University of Maryland.

Rightfully Hers: American Women and the Vote exhibit

Robyn Muncy guest curates exhibit at the National Archives to commemorate the centenary of the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment.

History

Dates: -
Rightfully Hers Promo
Robyn Muncy, professor of history, guest curated an exhibit at the National Archives marking the 100th anniversary of women in the U.S. attaining the right to vote.

Robyn Muncy, professor of history, is a guest curator of "Rightfully Hers: American Women and the Vote," an exhibit to commemorate the centenary of the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment at the National Archives in Washington, DC. The exhibit opened in March and will run through September 2020. 

The exhibition is part of a nationwide initiative exploring the generations-long fight for universal woman suffrage. Despite decades of marches, petitions, and public debate to enshrine a woman’s right to vote in the Constitution, the 19th Amendment – while an enormous milestone – did not grant voting rights for all. The challenges of its passage reverberate to the ongoing fight for gender equity today. 

What is now considered a key component of citizenship - the right to vote - is often taken for granted, and is not afforded to all through the Constitution. Through this initiative, the National Archives will not only highlight the hard-won victories that stemmed from the Women’s Suffrage movement, but also remind modern-day citizens of their responsibilities associated with the right to vote.

Read more about the exhibition on the National Archives website.

‘Joy is resistance’: cross-platform resilience and (re)invention of Black oral culture online

Catherine Knight Steele and Jessica H. Lu co-author new article in "Information, Communication & Society."

African American History, Culture and Digital Humanities, Communication, Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities

Dates: -

By Catherine Knight Steele, assistant professor of communication, and Jessica H. Lu, AADHum postdoctoral associate.

Abstract:

Existing research has affirmed that Black people historically mastered oral communication strategies to resist subjugation and oppression by dominant groups, and have emerged as leaders in technological innovation. This article takes seriously Black users’ social media engagement and focuses particularly on Black joy online. We analyze a rich collection of discourse spanning both Twitter and Vine through which Black users utilize the affordances of both platforms to challenge dominant narratives that demean and dehumanize Black people. We argue that Black users seize upon the interplay of the applications to not only express and foster joy, but to extend historic legacies of Black oral culture and further cultivate contemporary strategies that leverage – but also transcend – the affordances of each platform.

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Change and Resilience in Lakeland: African Americans in College Park, Maryland

Associate Professor of American Studies Mary Corbin Sies will host daylong digitization event to document the history of Lakeland, Md.

American Studies, Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities

Award Organization:

National Endowment for the Humanities Common Heritage Grant


Dates:

Project Director: Mary Corbin Sies, Associate Professor of American Studies 

Project Title: Change and Resilience in Lakeland: African Americans in College Park, Md., 1950–1980

Project Description: A daylong digitization event, by-appointment collecting visits to neighbors’ homes, and a public interpretation event to document and explore the history of Lakeland, an African-American community in Prince George’s County, Maryland. 

Image, Critique, Politics: Desistance and Polemics in the Caribbean: An Experimental Symposium

Juan Carlos Quintero-Herencia receives FORD-LASA Special Projects grant.

School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, Spanish and Portuguese

Dates:
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Juan Carlos Quintero-Herencia, professor Spanish and Portuguese in the School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, received a grant from the Latin American Studies Association (LASA) to host an symposium at the University of Maryland in Spring 2019 on Spanish Caribbean literature and culture.

This proposal describes the design and organization of an experimental symposium focused on the critical reconsideration of periods, situations and texts that have been polemics in the modern and contemporaneous Spanish Caribbean. It is, in addition, an intriguing proposal for its promise to combine esthetics and policy, literary critique and analysis of the current political, economic and environmental uncertainties that confront the societies of the Caribbean.

In Latin America, the Caribbean occupies a secondary or inferior position, and is often overlooked.  This project makes a significant effort to increase the academic visibility of this region, therefore it obtained a high score in the evaluation of the potential of its impact criteria.

The organizers and participants in the symposium, who come from different countries in the Hispanic Caribbean and other countries, show an excellent transnational and hemispheric commitment that includes the United States, Canada, Europe and Latin America, and seek to be involved in the proposed discussion and to supply texts to established and emerging academics, from a great variety of institutions. In summary, it is an original project, it is very well developed and is clear in its proposals, objectives and use of the budget.

 Selection Committee:

The project selection committee in this cycle was presided over by Mara Viveros-Vigoya, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Vice President of LASA and President-elect, and included the participation of María Victoria Murillo de Columbia University; Emiliana Cruz, from Ciesas, México DF, Vivian Andrea Martínez-Díaz, Universidad de los Andes and Jaime A. Alves of CSI/CUNY and Universidad ICESI/Colombia, former winner of the FORD-LASA grant in 2015.

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Debating Women: Gender, Education, and Spaces for Argument, 1835-1945

New book by Carly S. Woods highlights the crucial role debating organizations played as women sought to access the fruits of higher education in the U.S. and U.K.

Communication

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By Carly S. Woods, assistant professor of communication

Spanning a historical period that begins with women’s exclusion from university debates and continues through their participation in coeducational intercollegiate competitions, "Debating Women" highlights the crucial role that debating organizations played as women sought to access the fruits of higher education in the United States and United Kingdom. Despite various obstacles, women transformed forests, parlors, dining rooms, ocean liners, classrooms, auditoriums, and prisons into vibrant spaces for ritual argument. There, they not only learned to speak eloquently and argue persuasively but also used debate to establish a legacy, explore difference, engage in intercultural encounter, and articulate themselves as citizens. These debaters engaged with the issues of the day, often performing, questioning, and occasionally refining norms of gender, race, class, and nation. In tracing their involvement in an activity at the heart of civic culture, Woods demonstrates that debating women have much to teach us about the ongoing potential for debate to move arguments, ideas, and people to new spaces.

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Exploring Links Between Arts Education and Academic Outcomes in the International Baccalaureate

An interdisciplinary research team is exploring the relationship between arts education and college student outcomes.

Classics, School of Music, School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies

Award Organization:

$600,000, 2-year Arts in Education Research Grant


Dates: -
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Principal Investigator: Kenneth Elpus, associate professor of music education

Co-Principal Investigator: Stephanie Prichard, assistant professor of music education

Purpose: The purpose of this project is to explore the relation between rigorous, high quality arts education in high school and academic outcomes at the high school and postsecondary levels. Prior research on the association between arts education and academic outcomes has yielded mixed results, possibly due to wide variation in the definitions of arts education and the academic measures used by researchers. In this study, the research team will analyze a novel administrative dataset that overcomes those weaknesses to establish the relationship between arts education and academic achievement.

Project Activities: The research team will examine the academic achievement outcomes for students who chose to enroll in arts courses compared to those who did not for ten cohorts of American students who pursued courses from the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program, using data provided by the International Baccalaureate Organization. Additionally, they will link IB data to data from the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) to compare postsecondary outcomes for arts and non-arts IB students. Finally, they will see if their findings from the IB dataset replicate using data from the Maryland Longitudinal Data System (MLDS) Center for students in the public high schools of Maryland.

Products: The research team will produce preliminary evidence of the potential for arts education to improve high school and postsecondary academic outcomes. In addition, they will produce peer-reviewed publications in arts education and general education research journals, host in-service workshops for arts educators; participate in annual meetings for arts educators and policymakers; publish articles in education practitioner journals and magazines; publish blog posts and op-ed articles on platforms intended to reach the general public; and communicate about these products through various social media platforms.

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Solo Exhibition: "Jeux de bois"

Foon Sham created works on paper and site-specific sculptures for this exhibition using wood from south west of France

Art

Award Organization:

Arkad à Auvillar Art Center in Auvillar, France


Dates: -
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After a two month residence at the Arkad à Auvillar Art Center in Auvillar, France, Professor of Art Foon Sham created works on paper and site-specific sculptures for this exhibition using wood from south west of France.

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St. Louis Blues

Laura Demaría has published her first novel. 

School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, Spanish and Portuguese

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Laura Demaría, professor of Spanish, has published her first novel. 

“A diferencia de Utopía, la isla prodigiosa que se desea y es un sueño, St. Louis y todos los lugares de este blues siempre han estado presentes sencilla y abrumadoramente. Aquí no se inventa nada, ni se desea lo inencontrable. "St. Louis Blues" afirma la inmanencia de la vida, describiendo, con palabras discretas y casi dolorosas, esos secretos con que esta va construyendo su evidencia: nuestros encuentros, nuestras pasiones, nuestras soledades, todo aparente, pero inasible; todo resonante pero incomprensible. Esta inmanencia nos rodea y también nos invade; pero ¿qué sentido tiene? Laura Demaría nos ofrece una narración de permanente suspenso: no duda que lo existente tenga sentido; pero ¿dónde está?, ¿qué cara tiene?, ¿es el lugar donde estoy y el ostro que veo en el espejo?, ¿o son también los lugares de los otros y sus pasiones? ¿Hay una respuesta? Con una sabiduría gozosa, esta narración recorre estas supremas preguntas.” - Jorge Aguilar Mora, professor emeritus of Spanish.

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Toxic Ivory Towers: The Consequences of Work Stress on Underrepresented Minority Faculty

A new book by Ruth Enid Zambrana documents the professional work experiences of underrepresented minority faculty in U.S. higher education.

Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity, Women's Studies

Dates:
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By Ruth Enid Zambrana, professor and interim chair of women’s studies, director of the Consortium on Race, Gender, and Ethnicity

"Toxic Ivory Towers," seeks to document the professional work experiences of underrepresented minority (URM) faculty in U.S. higher education, and simultaneously address the social and economic inequalities in their life course trajectory. Ruth Enid Zambrana finds that despite the changing demographics of the nation, the percentages of Black and Hispanic faculty have increased only slightly, while the percentages obtaining tenure and earning promotion to full professor have remained relatively stagnant. Toxic Ivory Towers is the first book to take a look at the institutional factors impacting the ability of URM faculty to be successful at their jobs, and to flourish in academia. The book captures not only how various dimensions of identity inequality are expressed in the academy and how these social statuses influence the health and well-being of URM faculty, but also how institutional policies and practices can be used to transform the culture of an institution to increase rates of retention and promotion so URM faculty can thrive.  

 

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