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DASER: Arctic Ice: A Visual Archive of a Unique Collaboration

Two white probes sit in the snow.

DASER: Arctic Ice: A Visual Archive of a Unique Collaboration

Art | College of Arts and Humanities Thursday, January 26, 2023 6:30 pm-9:00 pm National Academy of Sciences 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20418

The Cultural Programs of the National Academy of Sciences (CPNAS) hosts a conversation featuring artist and University of Maryland Assistant Professor of Art Cy Keener, landscape researcher Justine Holzman, climatologist Ignatius Rigor and scientist John Woods, who collaborated over a four year period to create the exhibition Arctic Ice: A Visual Archive (on view at the National Academy of Sciences through February 15, 2023).

Their work is the result of the integration of field data, remote satellite imagery, scientific analysis and multimedia visual representation and documents Arctic ice that is disappearing due to climate change. What is unique about this art based on scientific data is that Keener and Holzman were involved in the design and construction of the tools that collected the data as well as their placement in the environment. With this work, their goal is to make scientific data tangible, visceral and experiential. They ask how artistic and creative practices can contribute to scientific endeavors while making scientific research visible to the public.

Add to Calendar 01/26/23 6:30 PM 01/26/23 9:00 PM America/New_York DASER: Arctic Ice: A Visual Archive of a Unique Collaboration

The Cultural Programs of the National Academy of Sciences (CPNAS) hosts a conversation featuring artist and University of Maryland Assistant Professor of Art Cy Keener, landscape researcher Justine Holzman, climatologist Ignatius Rigor and scientist John Woods, who collaborated over a four year period to create the exhibition Arctic Ice: A Visual Archive (on view at the National Academy of Sciences through February 15, 2023).

Their work is the result of the integration of field data, remote satellite imagery, scientific analysis and multimedia visual representation and documents Arctic ice that is disappearing due to climate change. What is unique about this art based on scientific data is that Keener and Holzman were involved in the design and construction of the tools that collected the data as well as their placement in the environment. With this work, their goal is to make scientific data tangible, visceral and experiential. They ask how artistic and creative practices can contribute to scientific endeavors while making scientific research visible to the public.

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